Platforms and the Press

Fact-based journalism is essential to public health, development, and accountable governance. The increasing dominance of online platforms over our public sphere has led to an uneasy relationship between news organizations and large tech companies. While the latter have generated new opportunities to connect journalists with audiences, evade censorship, and engage in influential cross-border collaborations, they have also forced journalists to contend with shifting algorithmic priorities, warped incentive structures in the online economy, and an increasingly complex array of technology policies that shape the environment in which they work and the business models for sustainability. Perhaps most urgently, the platformization of journalism has contributed to a crisis in funding in which quality journalism, particularly locally-focused and investigative journalism, has struggled to figure out how to navigate sustainability in the information age. 

This Symposium, which is organized by the UCLA Institute for Technology, Law & Policy, is intended to respond to the recent wave of legislative proposals aimed at supporting sustainable journalism by considering the trade-offs, challenges and opportunities related to various legislative interventions, with an eye to developing better practice regulatory standards, and a clear roadmap for how institutions should promote quality journalism. 

This event is sponsored by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Symposium Agenda

Friday, March 3

to be live-streamed

9:30 am – 9:45 am | Opening and Introduction 

9:45 am – 10:30 | Keynote

10:30 am – 12:00 pm | Panel: The Platformization of Journalism

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm | Lunch 

1:00 pm – 2:30 pm | Special Issue Presentation: Platforms, Data, and the Information Ecosystem 

2:30 pm – 2:45 pm | Break

2:45 pm – 3:45 pm | Breakout Conversations

  • Room 1: Break them up or harness them?
  • Room 2: Independence, and Biting the Hand that Feeds You
  • Room 3: Supporting Journalism or Supporting Misinformation?

3:45 pm – 5:15 pm | Panel: Regulation and Platform Responsibility 

5:15 pm – 7:15 pm | Reception

Saturday, March 4

9:30 am – 10:45 am | Panel: The Future of News

 

10:45 am – 11:00 am | Break

 

11:00 am – 12:00 pm | Panel:Understanding our Options

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm | Lunch

1:00 pm – 2:00 pm | Breakout sessions: Blue Sky Thinking for Sustainable Journalism

2:00 pm – 2:15 pm | Break

2:15 pm – 3:30 pm | Regroup and Present/Discuss

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm | Wrap up and next steps

Confirmed Participants

  • Julia Angwin, The Markup
  • Jesse Brown, Canadaland
  • José María León Cabrera, GK.City 
  • Aisha Counts, Protocol
  • Jennifer Dixton, Loyola University Chicago
  • Joan Donovan, Harvard Kennedy School
  • Jesse Gabriel, California State Assembly
  • Amy Gajda, Tulane Law School
  • Melinda Henneberger, The Sacramento Bee
  • Michael Karanicolas,  UCLA School of Law
  • David Kaye, UC Irvine School of Law
  • Frank LoMonte, University of Florida
  • Ryan Mac, The New York Times
  • A. Douglas Melamed, Stanford School of Law
  • Neil Netanel, UCLA School of Law
  • Preethi Nallu, Report for the World
  • Safiya Noble, UCLA Department of African American Studies
  • Alvin Ntibinyane, INK Centre for Investigative Journalism
  • Courtney Radsch, UCLA Institute for Technology, Law & Policy
  • Sarah Roberts, UCLA School of Education and Information Studies
  • Pamela Samuelson, Berkeley Law School
  • Anya Schiffrin, Columbia University
  • Joanna Smolinska, Directorate General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology, European Commission
  • Alan Soon, Splice Media
  • Maria Luisa Stasi, Article 19
  • Subramanian Vincent, Santa Clara University
  • Eugene Volokh, UCLA School of Law
Scroll to Top
Scroll to Top

Loading…